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Author Topic: Learn Japanese  (Read 6627 times)

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Offline FallinG_StaR

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2008, 05:19:18 PM »
Ok... Thanks...
"It is said that only a fool learns from his own mistakes, a wise man from the mistakes of others."-"A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing."
I wonder which one is true!?

Offline UruseiNeo

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #31 on: October 24, 2008, 09:01:23 PM »
In regards to "uchi" and "datcha" :

uchi, the word Lum uses to refer to herself (instead of watashi I guess), actually means "home" or "house" or my home/ my house.

datcha: U already know that at the end of most sentences is "desu." Well in normal conversation, "datcha" basically replaces desu. You shouldn't use "datcha" in polite conversation. Also datcha is usually used by people from a certain part of japan (I think, that's what my teacher said, I'm kinda iffy on the details. There are other types of replacements)

She also said that the short form of desu would be "de/da" (didn't know which she mean XD)

Funny, everyone time a Japanese person sees my UY shirt, they know almost immediately that its Lum. I wonder if there are any japanese people who DON'T know UY?

I'm gonna post the exercises later, thing is I JUST got back from 3 hours of Japanese ^_^


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Offline DarkDevil

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #32 on: October 25, 2008, 02:17:07 AM »
Interesting.
DarkDevil, king of the Demons.
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Offline veehive

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #33 on: October 25, 2008, 02:51:00 AM »
Very True.
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to waste riding lousy bicycles

Offline UruseiNeo

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #34 on: October 25, 2008, 02:56:38 AM »
PRACTICE

(1) Numbers

0  ゼロ/れい
      zero   ree

1  いち
      ichi

2  に
      ni

3  さん
      san

4  よん/し/(よ)
      yon   shi   (yo)

5  ご
      go

6  ろく
      roku

7  なな/しち
      nana   shichi

8  はち
      hachi

9  きゅう/く
      kyuu   ku

10  じゅう
        juu

11  じゅういち
        juuichi

12  じゅうに
        juuni

13  じゅうさん
        juusan

14  じゅうよん/じゅうし
        juuyon      juushi

15  じゅうご
        juugo

16  じゅうろく
        juuroku

17  じゅうなな/じゅうしち
        juunana      juushichi

18  じゅうはち
        juuhachi

19  じゅうきゅう/じゅうく
        juukyuu      juuku

20  にじゅう
        nijuu

30  さんじゅう
        sanjuu

40  よんじゅう
        yonjuu

50  ごじゅう
        gojuu

60  ろくじゅう
        rokujuu

70  ななじゅう
        nanajuu

80  はちじゅう
        hachijuu

90  きゅうじゅう
        kyuujuu

100 ひゃく
        hyaku

Just a small note, don't worry about the numbers with multiple translations. Just use the first one given for now.
--------------------------------------------------

A. Write the following numbers in Romanji (ABC not Hiragana)

  (a) 5   (b) 9  (c) 7  (d) 1  (e) 10

  (f) 8   (g) 2   (h) 6  (i) 4   (j) 3

B. Write the following numbers in Romanji

  (a) 45  (b) 83  (c) 19  (d) 76  (e) 52

  (f) 100 (g) 38  (h) 61  (i) 24   (j) 97

C. What are the answers?

(a) 5+3     (b) 9+1     (c) 3+4     (d) 6-6     (e) 10+9     (f) 8-7     (g) 40-25



Note: I actually DID skip two things which I plan going over a little after the practice. I posted the Practice early cause it was highly requested. ^_^


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Offline veehive

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #35 on: October 26, 2008, 03:28:10 AM »
'Neo asked for a post (so he could continue): c'est la.

What is the name of the text you use in your class, 'Neo (and the name of the author/authors)?

And, finally (I've been saving these up): you don't know how lucky you are, 'Neo, finding a class for learning Japanese. I've been looking locally and have found NOTHING :(. Frustrating, very very frustrating :mad:. The closest I have found (so far) would be at Kent State University (yes, the famous "four-dead-in-o-hi-o" Kent State U), a 120-mile (200Km) round trip. I cannot afford that!! :'(
Life is too short
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Offline UruseiNeo

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #36 on: October 26, 2008, 06:32:51 PM »
The book is called "An integrated course in elementary japanese Genki I" or something like that. There are 4 names listed:
Eri Banno, Yutaka Ohno, Yoko Sakane, and Chikako Shinagawa.
---------------------------------------------------------------

Expression Notes 1

おはよう/ありがとう >
Ohayoo is used between friends and family members, while ohayoo gozaimasu is used between less intimate acquaintances, similarly with arigatoo and arigatoo gozaimasu. The rule of thumb is: if you are on a first-name basis with someone, go for the shorter versions. If you would address someone as Mr. or Ms., use the longer versions. To give a concrete example, the social expectation is such that students are to use the longer variants when they speak with a professor.

さようなら > There are several good-bye expressions in Japanese, the choice among which depends on the degree separation. Sayoonara indicates that the speaker does not expect to see the person spoken to before she “turns a page in her life”; not until a new day arrives, or until fate brings the two together again, or until they meet again in the other world.

  じゃあ、また。        Jaa, mata.
  (Between friends, expecting to see each other again fairly soon.)
  [Note, I never really use this one.]

  しつれいします。    Shitsureeshimasu.
  (taking leave from a professor’s office, for example.

  いってきます。        Ittekimasu.
  (leaving home)



すみません > Sumimasen means (1) “Excuse me,” to get another person’s attention, (2) “I’m sorry,” to apologize for the trouble you have caused, or (3) “Thank you,” to show appreciation for what someone has done for you.

いいえ > Iie is primarily “No,” a negative reply to a question. In the dialogue, it is used to express the English phrase “Don’t mention it,” or “You’re welcome,” with which you point out that one is not required to feel obliged for what you have done for them.
[Basically it’s a reply to sumimasen, is what they are trying to say]

いってらっしゃい / いってきます / ただいま / おかえりなさい > Ittekimasu and itterasshai is a common exchange used at home when a family member leaves. The person who leaves say ittekimasu, which literally means “I will go and come back.” And the family members respond with itterasshai, which means “Please go and come back.”
   Tadaima and okaeri are used when a person comes home, The person who arrives home says tadaima (I am home right now) to the family members, and they respond with okaerinasai (Welcome home).


Expression Notes 2

あの > Ano indicates that you have some reservations about saying what you are going to say next. You may be worried about interrupting something someone is currently doing, or sounding rude and impolite for asking personal questions, for example.

じゃい / ええ > Both hai and ee mean “yes” in response to yes-no questions. Compared to hai, ee is more conversational and relaxed. In more informal situations, un is used.
   Hai is also used to respond to a knock at the door or to the calling of one’s name, meaning “Here,” as follows. (Ee cannot be replaced in this case.)

          ã™ã¿ã™
   Teacher: スミスさん?    Mr. Smith?
                Sumisu san?

   Student: はい。                 Here.
                 Hai.

そうですか > Soo desu ka acknowledges that you have understood what was just said “Is that so?” or “I see.”

Pronunciation of は > The particle はis pronounced “wa,” not “ha.” It should be written with は. All other instances of “wa” are written with わ.

   わたしの でんわばんごうは 37-8667です。
   Watashi no denwa bangoo wa san nana no hachi roku roku nana desu.
    My telephone number is 37-8667.

There are a few exceptions, such as konnichiwa (good afternoon) and konbanwa (good evening). They are usually written with こんいちは and こんばんは.

Numbers > Many number words have more than one pronunciation.

       ぜろ
   0 ゼロ [zero] and  ã‚Œã„ [ree] are both commonly used.
  
   1 いち [ichi], but pronounced as  ã„っ in いっぷん [ippun] (one minute) and いっちい [issai] (one-year old).

   2 に [ni] all the time. When you are reading out each digit separately, as when you give your phone number, it may be pronounced with a long vowel, as にい [nii]

   3 さん [san]   all the time. The part that follows it may change shape, as inさんぷん [sanpun-three minutes], instead of  ã•ã‚“ふん [sanhun].

   4 よん [yon] is the most basic, but forth-year student is よねんせい [yonensee] and four o’clock is よじ [yoji]. In some combinations that we will later learn, it is read as  し [shi] (as in しがつ [shigatsu], April). The part that follows this number may change shape too, as in よんぷん [yonpun] (Four minutes).

   5 ご [go] all the time. When read out separately, it may be pronounced with a long vowel, as ごう [goo].
  
   6 ろく [roku], but pronounced as ろっ in ろっぷん [roppun].

   7 なな [nana] is the most basic, but seven o’clock is しちじ [shichiji].

   8 はち [hachi], but usually pronounced as はっ in はっぷん [happun](8 minutes) and はっさい [hassai] (8 years old).

   9 きゅう [kyuu] is the most basic, but nine o’clock is くじ [kuji].

10   ã˜ã‚…う [juu], but pronounced as  ã˜ã‚…っ in  ã˜ã‚…っぷん [juppun] (ten minutes)  and じゅっさい [jussai] (10 years old).

Giving one’s telephone number > The particle no is usually placed in between the local exchange code and the last four digits. Therefore, the number 012-345-6789 is zero ichi ni, san yon go no, roku nana hachi kyuu.

せんせい > The word sensee is usually reserved for describing somebody else’s occupation. Watashi wa sensee desu makes sense, but may sound slightly arrogant, because the word sensee actually means an “honorable master.” If you (or a member of your family) are a teacher, and if you want to be really modest, you can use the word kyooshi instead.

さん > San is placed after a name as a generic title. It goes both with a given name and a family name. Children are referred to as chan (and boys in particular as kun), rather than san. Professors and doctors are usually referred to with the title sensee. San and other title words are never used in reference to oneself.
[I think they are leaving some details out in this area… but until otherwise said, we’re stuck following these rules]

Referring to the person you are talking to > The word for “you,” anata, is not very commonly used in Japanese. Instead, we use the name and a title like san and sensee to refer to the person you are talking to. Therefore, a sentence like “Ms. Hart, are you Swedish?” should be:


   ã¯ã‚と          ã€€ã™ãˆãˆã§ã‚“
   ハートさんはスウェーデンじんですか。
   Haato san wa sueedenjin desu ka.
               ã¯ã‚と        ã€€            すええでん    
        Instead of   ハアトさん、あなたは スウェーデンじんですか。
                          Haato san, anata wa sueedinjin desu ka.

Japanese names > When Japanese give their names, they say their family name first and given name last. Usually, they don’t have middle names. When they introduce themselves, they often say only their family name.

----------------------------------------------------
The next excercise will take place in the SPEAK JAPANESE topic!!!!


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Offline PrincessJenni

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #37 on: November 05, 2008, 08:37:15 AM »
thanks these expressions are really helpful

Offline veehive

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #38 on: November 23, 2008, 06:14:26 PM »
Here's a demonic little game to help learn the color names in Japanese. I've posted the link to the English-language version (as I am a lazy mono-language Uh-murr-uh-kin) (gomen nasai).

http://www.excite-webtl.jp/world/english/web/?wb_url=http%3A%2F%2Fflashfabrica.com%2Ff%5Flearning%2Fbrain3%2Fbrain03.html&wb_lp=JAEN&wb_dis=2

Remember -- you have to match the JAPANESE NAME of the color with the displayed "problem" color. Your score is given in Brain Age (lower is better).

Ganbatte!
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Offline UruseiNeo

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #39 on: April 03, 2010, 02:59:10 AM »
I remember some time ago someone explained how to set your computer to allow u to type japanese characters (I dunno if it was this topic or another, cant be sure).

Well right now I need to know how to undo whatever I did some time ago cause one of my windows only comes up in japanese characters (can't read it all)


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Offline cata

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #40 on: April 03, 2010, 11:12:06 AM »
Janus is the right person to help you with that! ;)

Offline Kroptik

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #41 on: April 03, 2010, 02:17:55 PM »
Which Windows do you have? Vista, XP, or 7?

If by any chance you have Vista, try this:
- Open your control panel
- Open regional and language options
- In the administration tab, click on change system's region (give admin permission)
- Change it to your country, press OK, and agree it restart your computer

It should be fine now. :P
Signatured postponed until I cba to make a new one. x.x

Offline UruseiNeo

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Re: Learn Japanese
« Reply #42 on: April 03, 2010, 04:12:52 PM »
No Vista, Windows XP

XP


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